Difference Between LOOSE LOSE LOSS and LOST

Loose Lose Loss Lost


is this correct?

it’s your loss if you lose me…

on 01/12/2015.

Yes, that’s correct.

on 24/03/2016.
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1 Answer(s)

Lose – is a verb that means ‘unable to find’ or ‘cease to retain’.

  • She always loses her keys, and finds them in the car later. 
  • They always lose their pens at school. 

 

Lost – is past tense of the verb ‘lose’.

  • She lost her keys yesterday.
  • Jennifer lost her glasses, and now she can’t see anything. 

 

Loss – is a noun. The fact or process of losing something or someone.

  • My grandpa was a great man. It was a big loss for the whole family when he passed away. 
  • It was a loss of time spending time with him. 

Loss can also mean an amount of money lost by a company or business:

  • Make sure your company has insurance. This can protect you from financial loss in the future. 

 

Loose is an adjective. It means ‘not tightly fixed or attached’.

  • My bookshelf is very loose. You need to fix it.
  • Be careful! Your shoelaces are loose. You can fall down. 

Loose can also be used as a verb. It means ‘to release’ or ‘set free’.

  • The horses got loose.
  • Let the dog loose! Can’t you see he wants to run around? 

 

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Supporter Answered on 29/04/2015.
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