English Adverbs of Quantity (List)!

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Hero Asked on 28/06/2014 in English Grammar.

Good job. keep it up

on 10/08/2016. Edit Delete

u r doing well , tnx alot

on 05/09/2016. Edit Delete

hello
morning

on 05/09/2016. Edit Delete

Sent please.

on 05/09/2016. Edit Delete

Very good.

on 05/09/2016. Edit Delete

Good morning

on 05/09/2016. Edit Delete
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Adverbs can tell you how something is done, for example, speak nicely or work hard. Adverbs can also tell you how much or how many of something you have.

Every noun is either countable (cat- cats, dog- dogs, elf- elves, fairy- fairies etc.) or uncountable (time, information, magic, happiness, witchcraft etc.) and this is something you need to consider when choosing an adverb to go together with a noun.

COUNTABLE NOUNS
With countable nouns, you may use the following adverbs:

MANY / MORE

  • My neighbour has many cats and she wants more. 

A LOT / LOTS

  • I want a lof of dogs and I want lots of cats too!

FEW / FEWER

  • There are just a few fairies left in the forest and soon there will be fewer.

 TOO MANY / TOO FEW

  • There are not too many fairies left and there are too few elves.

(NOT) ENOUGH

  • You can’t have enough cats!

UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS

MUCH / MORE

  • I haven’t got much time to spend with my dogs. I need more free time.

A LOT / LOTS

  • There’s a lot of magic in this forest and lots of witchcraft.

LITTLE / LESS

  • I have little information on witches and even less on dragons.

TOO MUCH / TOO LITTLE

  • You spend too much time with your dogs and too little with your friends.

(NOT) ENOUGH

  • That’s enough happiness for a lifetime.

You can also use adverbs to describe the degree to which something is. These adverbs may be used BEFORE ADJECTIVES (powerful, friendly, kind, crazy, rude, scary, dark etc.)

TOO

  • This spell is too powerful, don’t use it indoors.

SO

  • It’s so powerful, it can turn a hundred people into frogs.

A LITTLE (BIT)

  • Be careful with that cat lady. She’s a little bit crazy.

ENOUGH (comes after the adjective)

  • She’s a nice person, she’s just not friendly enough.

(NOT) VERY

  • I would say she’s very rude.

QUITE

  • This forest is quite scary.

RATHER

  • That dragon is rather scary, too.

PRETTY

  • It’s pretty dark in here.

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More for you:
Could you tell me when to use adverbs and when to use adjectives?
5 Types of Adverbs with Examples
Adverbs Of Frequency
Difference Between VERY, QUITE, TOO and SO!

Promoter Answered on 22/09/2014.
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