TO DO or TO MAKE a project?

Hero Asked on 29/04/2014 in English Grammar.

Wonderful! Great! Thank you so much for your help!! I appreciated a lot!!

on 13/05/2014.

Hi there!
I already know this type of pattern however it’s really useful to remember in one place.. Thank you for sharing.

on 17/05/2016. Edit Delete

nice

on 17/05/2016. Edit Delete

please increase its meaning and detail for knowing of some one

on 17/05/2016. Edit Delete

good..i like..

on 17/05/2016. Edit Delete
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1 Answer(s)

The verbs ‘do’ and ‘make’ are often confused, especially by English language learners. One of the main reasons behind this is that many languages have the same verb for MAKE and DO, such as German, Italian, and Portuguese.

You use the verb MAKE for constructing, building or creating something. It is mainly used to express an activity that creates something you can touch.

For example:

make dinner / make a mess

There are some exceptions to the above rule. These are collocations for the verb MAKE, such as:

  • make plans
  • make an exception
  • make arrangements
  • make money
  • make an excuse
  • make a decision
  • make noise
  • make an effort
  • make amends
  • make a telephone call

ALTHOUGH, YOU CANNOT SAY ‘I AM GOING TO MAKE A PROJECT’.

You could say:

  • I am making a robot for my project.
  • I am making a flower arrangement for my project.
  • I am going to make something big for my project.

 

The verb DO is used to express daily activities, but in contrast to the verb ‘make’ – they do NOT produce physical results.

For example:

do my homework / do the ironing

You can also use DO for general ideas, when you do not speak about something specific, but something vague instead. This is generally used with something, anything, nothing, everything etc.

  • Are you doing anything tonight?
  • She’s doing something, but I don’t know what. It’s a surprise.
  • I do everything for you!

There are also collocations that are used with the verb DO, such as:

  • do my best
  • do me a favour
  • do business

ALTHOUGH, ONCE AGAIN, YOU CANNOT SAY ‘I AM GOING TO DO A PROJECT’!

You could say:

  • I’m going to do my best with this project.
  • I’m going to do something different for the project.
  • What are you going to do for your project?
  • I don’t know what to do for my project.

What to use in this context:
There are many different ways of defining what you are about to DO for your project, but the verb you use depends on what the project entails! A project is a task that is set, and needs to be completed, so the verb that you use depends on what that task involves.

  • I’m going to make a remote-controlled aeroplane for my project.
  • I’m going to do something different for my project this year.

 

I would use one of the following verbs with ‘a project’:

START
CARRY OUT (phrasal verb)
UNDERTAKE
COMPLETE
DESIGN
ASSIGN
WORK ON (phrasal verb)

  • I’m going to start my project next month. (Meaning: I will begin working on my project next month)
  • I have to carry out a survey for my project. (Meaning: I have to complete a survey, as a part of my project)
  • You have to undertake a series of tests for this project. (Meaning: Many tests need to be done before the project can be completed.)
  • I haven’t completed my project yet. (Meaning: The project is unfinished, there is still work to be done.)
  • She has designed an eco-friendly car for her project. (Meaning: the verb ‘design’ tells us that she has compiled the data and the theoretical plan.)
  • She has made an eco-friendly car for her project. (Meaning: the verb ‘made’ tells us that she has now built the machine and you can see its physical form.)
  • My teacher has assigned this project to me. (Meaning: I have been told by my teacher that I am to complete / do this project.)
  • Would you like to work on my project with me? (Meaning: Would you like to assist / help / join me in completing this task?)

 

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Pro Editor Answered on 29/04/2014.

hi this information is useful thanks

on 17/05/2016. Edit Delete

this info . is useful

on 17/05/2016. Edit Delete
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