What does "DO OVER SOMEONE" mean?

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do over someone - fight - battle - war - struggle - combat - contest

Do over is a phrasal verb, sometimes known as a multi-word verb.

 

A phrasal verb consists of a Verb + a Particle.

The verb is typically combined with:

 

A preposition – for example turn on

  • My brother turned on the television and ignored me completely.

 

An adverb – for example break down.

  • I am so sorry I am late, my car broke down on the motorway on the way here!

 

A combination of both – for example look down on.

  • I really don’t like how Sarah acts like she is better than me; she is always looking down on me.

 

A phrasal verb functions as a verb whose meaning is usually different from the combined meanings of the individual words. The meanings of give and give up are very different!

  • Peter gave me a lovely watch for my birthday.
  • Anthony should give up cigarettes, they are so bad for his health.

 

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The phrasal verb to do over someone is separable – that means the direct object can go in between the verb and the particle or at the end of the phrasal verb – to do over someone or to do someone over – unless the direct object is a pronoun, then it must go between the two parts of the phrasal verb – do it over.

[Tweet “To do someone over – to attack someone, to kick and beat someone or, to use another phrasal verb, to beat someone up.”]

To do someone over means to attack someone, to kick and beat someone or, to use another phrasal verb, to beat someone up.

  • Shane really did over Andy this time – he was admitted to the hospital last night with broken ribs and a broken nose.
  • Billy was furious when he found out that Oscar was seeing his girlfriend behind his back. He went to Oscar’s house and he really did him over; I saw Oscar today and he has two black eyes!!
  • If I find out who robbed my car I am going to do them over!

[Tweet “Do over is often used in the passive voice: As soon as I saw the broken window I knew the house had been done over.”]

Do over is often used in the passive voice:

  • As soon as I saw the broken window I knew the house had been done over.

[Tweet “Do over can also be used to describe decorating a building or room in a different way.”]

Do over can also be used to describe decorating a building or room in a different way.

  • Sally does her house over every year – she must be rich!
  • It’s been so long since I have had my house done over, I have wallpaper from the 80’s.

[Tweet “To do something over means to redo or repeat something.”]

To do something over means to redo or repeat something.

  • You failed your French exam Catherine, I am afraid you are going to have to do it over at the end of the summer holidays.
  • Sam, you painted the living room pink when I asked you to paint it green, you’ll have to do it over.

 

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