START or BEGIN? Simple Explanation!

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start begin rocket

In most cases, BEGIN and START are interchangeable.

However, there are a few cases where only START is possible.

[Tweet “START (verb) means to cause something to happen or to cause someone to pursue something.”]

START (verb) means to cause something to happen or to cause someone to pursue something. In other words, START is used to indicate when inaction turns into action.

  • I will start the car in 5 minutes. 
  • Can you start the washing machine?
  • He started a new restaurant business. 

Only START can be used in the cases above.
When we’re talking about machines or business, we can only use START.

 

[Tweet “BEGIN means to take the first step in performing something or to come into being.”]

BEGIN means to take the first step in performing something or to come into being. BEGIN is more formal than START.

  • The conference will begin at 8:00.
  • We will begin the test in half an hour. 
  • The show is about to begin.

 

START can also be used in the examples above. (The conference will start at 8:00)

The main difference between START and BEGIN:

1. Only START is used when we’re talking about machines or business
2. BEGIN is used in formal cases (official proceedings).

 

P.S. START can be a verb and a noun. BEGIN is only a verb (beginning – noun).

 

Read more:
Formal and Informal Email Phrases Starting with Greetings
List of Sentence Connectors in English with Examples!
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Facebook English: 14 Super Pages to Learn and Teach English

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