1 answer

Staff 26/11/2014
Public

The verb COMPARE means examining two or more things to see how they are different and/or similar.

[Tweet “The verb COMPARE means examining two or more things to see how they are different and/or similar.”]

When comparing things that are different in nature, use TO:

[Tweet “When comparing things that are different in nature, use COMPARE TO:”]

  • Why do you keep comparing yourself to your sister? (You are two different people, no point in making comparisons.)
  • Shall I compare you to a summer’s day? (A person and a day are two very different things.)
  • The way he delivered his speech could be compared to a waterfall hitting the rocks with great force. (A speech and a waterfall are two things very different in nature.)
  • I’m so insignificant compared to Superman. (I’m not a superhero, we are different in nature.)

 

When comparing things that are similar in nature, use WITH:

[Tweet “When comparing things that are similar in nature, use COMPARE WITH:”]

  • London is a boring city compared with Paris. (Both London and Paris are big, cosmopolitan cities- they are similar in nature.)
  • Why don’t we compare Mr Smith’s CV with Mr Patterson’s CV to help us choose the right candidate? (The two CVs are similar in nature.)
  • I can’t compare Suzy with Charlotte, they’re both my daughters and I love them. (The two girls are similar in nature: both are my daughters.)
  • My parents are quite strict, but they’re not so bad compared with yours. (I’m talking about similar things: parents.)
#answer-2439

This question has been closed