Moral Definition › Synonyms for Moral

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Moral

Is a noun as well as an adjective. Moral seems to have originated from a Roman scholar named Cicero and “coined” the term in about 45 BC. 

As a noun, Moral can mean a lesson that a person can learn or be taught from things like stories. Also, it can mean a person’s principles or values.

Example Noun (as a lesson):

  • The poem’s moral is that you should never judge a person on first appearances.



Example Noun (as a value, principle or standard):

  • Her work morals are not what I expected.

As an adjective, Moral also has more than one meaning. The first definition describes the goodness or how bad a person’s character is. The second describes someone’s personal beliefs about what is right and what is wrong.

Example (describing a person’s character):

  • He would never do that as he is a moral man.

Example (a value, principle or standard): 

  • When they designed the charter of rights it was to ensure we all conducted ourselves with the highest morals.

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Moral (as noun)

Has a few different meanings depending on the context it is used.

Lesson
In the context of moral, a person learns something either through being taught, reading or experiencing a concept of value.

  • I hope by sharing this story with you, there has been a lesson learned about the value of money.

Message
In the context of moral, it is something learned or taught through knowledge and/or experience.

  • The lyrics from the song provides a better understanding of the message of trust.

Meaning
In the context of moral, it is the intended message to communicate something to someone.

  • When we look at his message of the story, he is trying to convey tolerance for diversity.

Significance
In the context of moral, the meaning of a phrase, words or idea being conveyed. It is the meaning of words or phrases found by the listener and given by the speaker.

  • The significance of the CEO’s speech is to emphasize people must come first and then money will follow: Take care of the people and they will take care of your money.

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Point
In the context of moral, a significant message or idea being communicated.

  • After listening to the speech again, it is clear the point he made was that we can no longer sustain the level of costs being generated.

Moral code
In the context of moral, it refers to a written, usually formal set of rules outlining ethical or moral behavior adopted by a person or group of people.

  • To be accepted by the profession you must sign and accept the moral code and faithfully carry them out in every part of your life.

Principles
In the context of moral, it is source or basis of something or a message.

  • The principle that is being conveyed is that we must all be aware of the need for sleep.

Scruples
In the context of moral, generally it is a feeling of doubt or worry regarding values and idea of right and wrong.

  • The scruples of the message communicate tolerance first.

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Adjective (Moral)

Virtuous
Having or showing high ethical standards

  • She has demonstrated herself to be a virtuous leader, even during the most difficult times.

Righteous
Describes a person who is of high moral standards.

  • He is a righteous manager, the best!

Upstanding
We use this adjective to describe someone who is respectable and good.

  • He was an upstanding member of the community, we will miss him dearly.

Principled
A person who has a strong sense of right and wrong.

  • She has always been a principled lawyer, you don’t find that too often.

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Honorable
This describes a person who behaves honest and kind way.

Just
This describes a person who is fair in their actions with to others.

  • I want to thank you for your work, you are a just manager who I trust.

Noble
This adjective we use to describe someone who is worthy of honour.   

  • She by far the noblest of all the physicians I can award this prize to.

Incorruptible
We often use this adjective to describe an individual who cannot be corrupted or influenced to do something wrong.

  • Our Mayor has proven to be an exception to the rule of what we come to expect from politicians, she is truly incorruptible.

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